Home    Contact us   
    Home
    Obesity clinics
    Obesity surgeons
    Obesity surgery for children
    Post weight loss surgery
    Risks of weight loss surgery
    Suitability for weight loss surgery
    Weight loss surgery abroad
    Weight loss surgery costs
    Weight loss surgery on
    the NHS
    Weight loss surgery stories
    Weight loss surgery UK
    Affordable Weight Loss Surgery
    After Weight Loss Plastic Surgery
    After Weight Loss Surgery
    Bariatric Surgery For Weight Loss
    Bariatric Surgery Weight Loss
    Bariatric Weight Loss Surgery
    Before And After Weight Loss Surgery
    Best Surgery For Weight Loss
    Bmi For Weight Loss Surgery
    Bypass Surgery For Weight Loss
    Bypass Surgery Weight Loss
    Bypass Weight Loss Surgery
    Cost Of Weight Loss Surgery
    Criteria For Weight Loss Surgery
    Diabetes And Weight Loss Surgery
    Excess Skin After Weight Loss Surgery
    Free Weight Loss Surgery
    Gastric Band Surgery For Weight Loss
    Gastric Bypass Surgery Weight Loss
    Gastric Bypass Weight Loss Surgery
    Gastric Surgery For Weight Loss
    Gastric Surgery Weight Loss
    Gastric Weight Loss Surgery
    How To Finance Weight Loss Surgery
    How To Get Weight Loss Surgery On The NHS
    Insurance For Weight Loss Surgery
    Laparoscopic Weight Loss Surgery
    Loose Skin After Weight Loss Surgery
    NHS Weight Loss Surgery
    No Surgery Weight Loss
    Obesity Weight Loss Surgery
    Plastic Surgery For Weight Loss
    Pre Surgery Weight Loss Diet
    Price Of Weight Loss Surgery
    Risks Of Weight Loss Surgery
    Skin Surgery After Weight Loss
    Sleeve Weight Loss Surgery
    Surgery For Weight Loss
    Weight Gain After Weight Loss Surgery
    Weight Loss After Gastric Bypass Surgery
    Weight Loss Bypass Surgery
    Weight Loss Plastic Surgery
    Weight Loss Surgery Balloon
    Weight Loss Surgery Before And After
    Weight Loss Surgery Clinic
    Weight Loss Surgery Complications
    Weight Loss Surgery Diet
    Weight Loss Surgery Doctors
    Weight Loss Surgery Financing
    Weight Loss Surgery Group
    Weight Loss Surgery Insurance
    Weight Loss Surgery On The NHS
    Weight Loss Surgery Options
    Weight Loss Surgery Procedures
    Weight Loss Surgery Sleeve
    Weight Loss Surgery Success
    Weight Loss Surgery Support Groups
    Weight Loss Surgery
    Weight Loss Without Surgery
    What Is Weight Loss Surgery
    Types of weight loss
    surgery

Bmi For Weight Loss Surgery




Bmi For Weight Loss Surgery

Those who are considering surgical procedures for losing weight should first check the required BMI for weight loss surgery. Weight loss surgery is only allowed for those who have very high body mass index (BMI) values. People with high BMI are at risk of developing serious health problems, and weight loss surgery could only be their last hope when weight reduction is not achieved through conventional means.

The BMI for weight loss surgery helps doctors not only in assessing the qualification of the patient to undergo weight loss surgery but also in choosing the most suitable bariatric procedure. The BMI may only provide the approximate values of a person’s body fat but it does help in determining the medical conditions related to weight.


What does BMI for weight loss surgery stand for?



BMI stands for the body mass index which helps in gauging the amount of fat in a person’s body relative to his or her height and weight. It is effectively used in determining the ideal weight of a person and figuring out his or her risk of developing weight-related health conditions. The BMI for weight loss surgery is high, and people with high BMI are at risk of or could already have obesity-related health problems. Anyone can calculate his or her BMI by simply dividing the weight in pounds by the product of height in inches multiplied by itself, and then multiplying the answer by 703.

How important is BMI for weight loss surgery?



The body mass index does not accurately measure the amount of fat in a person’s body but it does provide an approximate amount of body fat. The BMI for weight loss surgery is very important because it helps doctors assess the physical condition of the patient and medical conditions that could likely develop. It also helps doctors in choosing the right bariatric procedure based on the amount of excess fat that must be removed from the patient’s body. Above all, since this method of weight reduction is not for everyone, the BMI for weight loss surgery is one of the means to determine whether it is medically needed or not.

What is the level of BMI for weight loss surgery?



In order to qualify for surgical treatment, the patient must meet the required BMI for weight loss surgery.
  • People with body mass index of 40 and above who are considered morbidly obese.
  • Those who are super obese, or with BMI of more than 50, can go for bariatric surgery.
  • Surgery might also be recommended for those who have BMI of 35 when they are already suffering from any sort of obesity-related health problems such as heart disease and diabetes.

What should patients do if surgery is denied even though they meet the BMI for weight loss surgery?



BMI for weight loss surgery is not the only basis that physicians consider in recommending surgery to reduce weight. Patients should understand that weight loss surgery is risky and requires long-term commitment to abide to the guidelines for the treatment to work. Surgery may also be denied if the patient has underlying medical conditions which may worsen when surgery is done. The best thing patients can do once surgery is denied is to ask the physician about other weight loss treatment options.


↑ Back to Top


Weight loss surgery  |  Site Map  |  Resources  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us